Stanford yield better than HBS

Why Stanford’s Yield, Despite Being Lower, Is Better than That of HBS?

No doubt, this is a controversial topic.

Traditionally, HBS has had the highest yield (88-90% range) of all MBA programs, followed by Stanford (78-84% range).

(Yield of an incoming class of an MBA program is the percentage of accepted applicants who join the program, and it’s one of the best market-driven statistics that reflect reputation of a program.)

Then, how does such bold, cold statistic lie?

It doesn’t.

But it doesn’t reveal the entire picture, either.

Do I need to send official GMAT score to my target school if …? [FAQs]

“I’m a reapplicant. Do I need to send official GMAT score again this year?”

“I took GMAT three years back, but I’m applying only this year. Do I need to send my official score again to the schools which I selected while taking the test?”

These are some of the questions regarding reporting of official GMAT score that bewilder applicants to MBA programs. This post tries to clarify most such questions.

ISB Interview: On What Questions Are You More Likely to Be Grilled? [Recent Interview]

The interview board can grill you (or ask series of supplementary questions) on any part of your profile, but, as it happened with few applicants in ISB interviews this year, you’re more likely to face probing questions particularly on two parts of your profile – leap of faith and the most important accomplishments/ experiences.

In one of the interviews, for example, Q&A on just two experiences constituted more than half the interview time.

Yes, half the time!

And because the interview board is so much more interested in these parts of your profile, your responses here can be a major determinant of your interview’s outcome.

Is Your GMAT Score 30 Points Below the Average Score of Your Target School?

If yes, then read on.

This post may resolve some of your dilemmas on retaking the test in such situations.

There are applicants who think they’ve blown away their chances of making it to top-ten schools after getting an unsatisfactory 720 in GMAT (this post holds good for GRE as well), cursing lapse of those few crucial moments of concentration while taking the test.

Though this example of 720 may be bit extreme, there are genuine cases of concern where applicants fall short of the average GMAT score of their target school by a tantalizing 30-odd points.

Why some applicants don't join HBS?

11% Accepted Applicants Don’t Join HBS – Where Do They Go?

MIT Sloan loses nearly 40% of its accepted applicants. Chicago Booth, too, loses nearly 40%. Tuck and Ross, almost 50%.

And these are some of the best MBA programs around.
Where do these accepted applicants go?

Most to higher-ranked and rival schools such as HBS, Stanford, Wharton, Columbia, and Kellogg. And a small fraction drops out i.e. doesn’t join any school (for reasons to be covered later in this post).

It’s understandable that a Sloan admit is very likely to prefer HBS over Sloan, but why does an HBS-admit, sometimes, not join HBS despite its unmatched brand equity.

Getting B-school Application Reviewed by Alumni: Avoid These Mistakes

Few months back, I received an application for feedback from an applicant who, despite having a solid academic and professional profile, didn’t get interview calls from both the schools he applied to in the first round.

There were few glaring oversights in his essays, which largely explained the disappointing result he had. What was different in this case, though, was that his application was vetted by a friend and current B-school student (one and the same person). Yet, those mistakes slipped through the crack.

Possible reason?