30+ and applying to MBA programs

Are You 30+? MBA Programs May Have 3 Concerns on Your Application

Average age of the class at HBS is 27 years. At Columbia, it’s 28. That’s usually the range for most U.S. B-schools: 27-28 years. Some schools, however, don’t provide average age of their class; instead they provide average work experience, which usually is 5 years (to name a few: Wharton, UCLA, and MIT – 5, Stern – 4.5, and Stanford, a relative outlier – 4). The average work experience too points toward a similar average age.

Though the average age of most programs is not too far from 30, B-schools do have some specific concerns about the candidature of applicants falling in 30+ age bracket, though very few air it openly. (There is nothing sacrosanct about 30; it’s just a metaphor for older applicants.)

Acceptance rate and yield of MBA programs

The Two B-School Popularity Indices Most Applicants Are Unaware Of

You’ll only obscurantly come across the two, almost in conjunction with each other, in few MBA admission-outreach events, articles comparing MBA programs, and MBA program websites.

Nevertheless, these are two of the most keenly monitored and, often, proactively-managed indices by MBA programs.

Why?

Because they are strong, market-determined reflection of popularity of their programs.

Jason Fried TED Talk

Why Work Doesn’t Happen at Work? [Ted Talk]

How many times last week you got uninterrupted four hours at work? (Uninterrupted means uninterrupted – no meetings, impromptu chat from boss or colleague, phone calls, and similar disturbances.)

Two hours?

One hour?

You’ll have to really stretch your memory to recall when you last got even one hour of uninterrupted time.

Not surprisingly, there are days when we wonder, “Did I get anything solid done today?”

Jason Fried, co-founder of 37 signals, in this satirical TED Talk argues that blocking Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube at workplace isn’t the solution. The solution, according to him and rightly so, is to have less meetings and less interruptions. And in the end, he suggests three solutions to get more done at workplace.